The Matlock – Star Trek Connection

Before I start this, I feel a few words need to be said. It has taken me months to make this post happen and it’s been one problem after another. First, I wanted to track down and watch the episodes presented here, before I wrote about them, which proved exceedingly problematic. I’ve always prided myself on being able to find any show online, but, for some reason, Matlock episodes were a closely guarded treasure. It took some time to track them all down. Once the post was written and I started to create this page, I began to look for YouTube clips to connect with the different episodes and, lo and behold, YouTube is filled with Matlock episodes and very few actual clips. But, I wanted to post this, so some of these clips are not the best, or even from Matlock. Please take this as an apology and I hope you still enjoy my post. 

Matlock has been a guilty pleasure of mine for as long as I can remember. If you’re not familiar with the series, it’s a mystery/crime show that ran on NBC from 1986 until 1992, when it found a new home on ABC for 3 more years. The program followed titular, geriatric superhero, Ben Matlock (Andy Griffith of the Andy Griffith Show), a Georgian (the state, not the country) lawyer who solved crimes and saved his clients with a combination of shrewd wits and dogged persistence. He was aided by a younger blonde woman and a black assistant. If that description of his co-stars seems generic, it’s because it is. 

Seasons 1-3 has Tyler Hudson (Kene Holliday of Carter County and the voice of Roadblock on the cartoon G.I. Joe)) working as Matlock’s African American private investigator and Charlene Matlock (Linda Purl, who guest starred on several other shows, including True Blood and The Office) and Matlock’s daughter, another attorney working with him in season 1. Charlene moves to Philadelphia after the first season, to be replaced by Michelle Thomas (Nancy Stafford of St. Elsewhere and Sidekicks), a different blonde lawyer, who moves in as Matlock’s partner. In season 4, Tyler has left for greener pastures and another black private investigator, Conrad McMasters (Clarence Gilyard, Jr or Walker, Texas Ranger and Top Gun), has taken over. Trust me, I could write a book about the series, Matlock, but I’m afraid it would have a very small audience. Instead, I’d like to talk about the Matlock-Star Trek connection. 

Given the relatively small world that television is, one of my idosyncratic joys is seeing television actors in roles very different from the ones they are famous for. In that respect, Matlock is a repository of joy. There are countless (mainly because I haven’t bothered to count) famous actors that have walked on Matlock’s stage, the likes of which have included Randy Travis, Don Knotts and Milton Berle, but I would like to talk about the oddly numerous Star Trek alumni that have appeared on this show. Cause if there’s something that I love more than Matlock, it’s Star Trek. And Star Trek actors have thrived amongst Matlock’s stage. I haven’t done exhaustive research into the subject, but here are a few episodes that feature Star Trek alumni.

The Angel – S01E11

I’ll kick it off with a twofer. When a rock diva, Angel, gets black-out wasted and wakes up in her manager’s house with his murdered corpse, she needs the expertise of Matlock to save her from life in prison. She is the slutty brat who is brought into line by the daddy dom that is Matlock. No, seriously, there’s a real Daddy Dom/little girl vibe going on here that gets kinda weird. Jonathan Frakes (AKA the ever dashing, William Riker, AKA Number 1) plays the prosecuting DA opposing Matlock and Steward Moss (Made two appearances in the original series. One was episode 4, the Naked Time, and the other was episode 21 of the second season, By Any Other Name) makes a brief appearance as the soon to be dead manager. 

The Other Woman – S03E11

This episode shows a very different side of Kira (Nana Visitor) as she plays a woman crippled by tragedy. Visitor’s husband (on the show, not her real husband, Matthew Rimmer) is murdered and Matlock defends the psychiatrist accused of the crime. Even Odo couldn’t have unraveled this tangled web, and it’s good he doesn’t have to, because Visitor’s character is crazier than a shit house rat. You’ve never seen the Major like this before, but, then again, she didn’t have to live in Atlanta in the 80’s.

The Play – S8 E1

Matlock has been cast in a local play production, by none other than our favorite, shape-shifting security office, Rene Auberjonois (AKA Odo, from Deep Space Nine). One of the running story lines in this episode is Matlock being a horrible actor, but he’s really bad at playing that role. It’s almost too meta for me watching an actor, Andy Griffith, badly play a bad actor. It’s kind of mind blowing to see. Needless to say, Rene’s character wants Matlock off the stage, until he gets accused of murder and then he lets his desperation cloud his artistic integrity. As they say, the show must go on. 

The Haunted – S8 E8 & 9

This two-part episode has more going on than Bourbon street during Mardi Gras and guest stars our favorite Star Trek character with a god complex, John de Lancie (AKA Q). Fittingly enough, he plays a plastic surgeon, who is being sued by Matlock regular, the bumbling Cliff Lewis (played by Daniel Roebuck of Nash Bridges, The Devil’s Rejects and Three From Hell. Oddly enough, he was in an episode of Star Trek TNG, “Unification”). Secrets and lies fill this episode as Cliff is reduced to little more than a gigolo and  Matlock has to save the day. 

Fatal Seduction – S8 E2 & 3

Jeri Ryan (AKA 7 of 9, from Star Trek Voyager) shows up around the 7 minute mark of this 2 part episode, sporting a white bikini and looking like trouble. She turns out to be deadlier than any Borg, as she uses her feminine wiles to use men like her personal playthings. Not the greatest of episodes, except for the gratuitous amount of skin that Ryan shows. Matlock needs his whole team on board to outsmart the young femme fatale, which is odd considering that he’s supposed to be one of the best lawyers in the country and she’s just a teenage girl, but those are the writers for you. 

There you have it. There may be more episodes floating around out there, but, for the love of God, there’s only so much Matlock that even I can take. I figure 5 episodes is enough for one day. I haven’t looked into why this connection exists, but it seems sort of odd, particularly because Star Trek is CBS’s baby, but maybe the shows shared some casting agency. Whatever the reason, seeing a member of Star Fleet face off against the genteel and shrewd Ben Matlock fills me with endless delight.